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OHIO — Billions of dollars will be coming to Ohio from the 

President Biden and bipartisan majorities in Congress have passed pro-worker legislation to repair our roads, bridges, and more. Here are a few ways the law will help Ohio.

Our union brothers and sisters are on strike across the United States. As we head into the holiday season, they need our financial support. Consider giving to one of these many strike funds.

NYT: How did you get your start in the labor movement?

Liz Shuler: I came up through the IBEW [International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers]. My father was a union member and worked for PGE [an Oregon utility]. Clerical workers were not in a union, and my mother and I were organizing them. PGE was a study in the difference a union can make: Power linemen were respected and made good wages, and nonunion clerical workers were not listened to and didn’t have a voice.

North Shore AFL-CIO Executive Secretary Dan O'Malley issued the following statement regarding yesterday's election of Justin Bibb as the next mayor of Cleveland:

The picket line has been crowded lately. Tens of thousands of workers are on strike, including nurses in Massachusetts, United Auto Workers at John Deere, coal miners in Alabama, metal workers in West Virginia, hospital workers in New York, ironworkers in Pennsylvania and Kellogg’s workers in four states.

Workers at companies like Kellogg’s, Nabisco and John Deere have hit the picket lines in recent weeks hoping to get a better deal from their employers. A new survey suggests the public by and large supports them.

The AFL-CIO labor federation commissioned the progressive pollster Data for Progress to take the public’s temperature on the strikes that have made headlines this summer and fall. The online survey of nearly 1,300 likely voters asked if they “approve or disapprove of employees going on strike in support of better wages, benefits, and working conditions.”

Marcial Reyes could have just quit his job. Frustrated with chronic understaffing at the Kaiser Permanente hospital where he works in Southern California, he knows he has options in a region desperate for nurses.

Instead, he voted to go on strike.

And many of them are either hitting the picket lines or quitting their jobs as a result.

The changing dynamics of the US labor market, which has put employees rather than employers in the driver's seat in a way not seen for decades, is allowing unions to flex their muscle.

Recent polling from Data for Progress/Vox shows that 59% of likely voters support the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act. With that said, far fewer understand what the legislation actually does. In this article, we will attempt to break it down.